Learn about all the data breaches in 2017 and the steps that companies can take to prevent their organization from becoming victim to a breach – Ohio CPAWhile 2017 may have been a great year overall for technology, it felt like we were hearing about a new breach or hack every day. As a result, it became alarming at how vulnerable our personal information and the information of our clients is and will continue to be. Below are some brief recaps of some of the larger breaches in 2017:

Equifax – personal data, including social security numbers, of 145 million people were stolen in July.

Yahoo – in October, Yahoo’s parent company Verizon announced that every one of Yahoo’s 3 billion accounts was hacked in 2013 which is three times what was first though.

WannaCry – hackers leveraged leaked NSA tools and targeted businesses running outdated windows software.

NotPetya – the computer virus targeted Ukranian businesses using compromised tax software. The malware spread to major global businesses including FedEx who attributed a $300 million loss to the attack while a subsidiary of the company had to suspend business.

Bad Rabbit – ransomware that posed as an Adobe Flash installer on news and media websites that hackers had compromised. The ransomware mostly affected Russia.

Voter records – approximately 200 million voter records were exposed online after a GOP data firm misconfigured a security setting in its Amazon cloud storage service.

Uber – technically this breach occurred in 2016 but wasn’t made public until November 2017. Data of 57 million Uber customers was stolen, and Uber attempted to pay the hackers $100,000 to cover it up.

Ransomware is clearly big business for cyber criminals, and in 2018, it will continue to be on the rise as we become more dependent on our devices and internet connectivity for personal and business use. Ransomware also has the ability to extend beyond infecting data of a computer. Imagine if a robotic arm used in a manufacturing line were to get hacked. This kind of cyber attack has the ability to put an entire manufacturing line at risk.

Defend your Information from Breaches

This year, you can get ahead of the curve by taking preliminary steps to ensure that your data remains protected. Below are some ways that Barnes Dennig can help make sure you’re prepared for 2018:

  1. SOC for Cybersecurity
  2. Data Security Assessment
  3. Network Security Testing
  4. Payment Card Industry – Data Security Standards Compliance Assistance
  5. Social engineering Testing
  6. HIPAA Compliance Assistance (HITRUST or NIST standards)
  7. GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation)

Contact us with questions regarding our IT Controls services by asking us a questions or giving us a call at 513-241-8313. You can also visit our IT Controls services page to learn about the services that the Barnes Dennig offers, and whether they might be applicable to you or your organization.